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Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest
Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest

Damascus Stiletto with SAF Commando Crest

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Damascus steel was the forged steel of the blades of swords smithed in the Near East from ingots of Wootz steel[1] either imported from Southern India or made in production centres in Sri Lanka,[2] or Khorasan, Iran.[3] These swords are characterized by distinctive patterns of banding and mottling reminiscent of flowing water, sometimes in a "ladder" or "rose" pattern. Such blades were reputed to be tough, resistant to shattering, and capable of being honed to a sharp, resilient edge.[4]

Wootz (Indian), Pulad (Persian), Fuladh (Arabic), Bulat (Russian) and Bintie (Chinese) are all names for historical ultra-high carbon crucible steel typified by carbide segregation.

The reputation and history of Damascus steel has given rise to many legends, such as the ability to cut through a rifle barrel or to cut a hair falling across the blade, though the accuracy of these legends is not reflected by the extant examples of patterned crucible steel swords which are often tempered in such a way as to retain a bend after being flexed past their elastic limit.[13] A research team in Germany published a report in 2006 revealing nanowires and carbon nanotubes in a blade forged from Damascus steel,[14][15]